OCTOBER 6, 2011 4:19AM

Steve Jobs / Faster Horses/ Love for Sale

Rate: 9 Flag

 

 

The world will be awash with tributes to American innovator Steve Jobs who died today.

 

The success of his ideas illustrate America at its best.

 The Customer is Always Right

Steve Jobs was famous for *not* asking customers what they want. An underlying basis for this was the belief that a customer is simply not in a position to articulate his desires in a manner that can lead to iconic products. What the customer really wants is something that doesn't exist. 

As Henry Ford is alleged to have said:

"If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses." 

With lovers, basic communication is bedrock. But what really gets the heart pounding is giving that which is deeply desired but -- for whatever reason -- can't be articulated. 

And They Want it All

A gift is about everything.  Not the thing. Everything.

It is possible to look for the origins of our modern economy as part of a larger tradition of exchange and reciprocity. This point of view has been explored at length by anthropologists. It provides striking insight into our present market driven lives by placing them in broader human context.

In a world of change, every innovation is a loss yet every loss is also a gain.

For us, gifts are felt as the inverse of commerce. Markets are anonymous, gifts are personal. Love for sale? Not so much.

A gift starts with the package. 

 

There was a time when the Tiffany robin's egg blue box spoke volumes.

But for generations followed by a letter [X, Y, Z, etc.], it was more likely from Apple. 

Stop Motion: Macbook Pro - Box Opening from Craig Pulsifer on Vimeo.

There are rare individuals that can bend reality. This is one small example. The world of technology, commerce, and markets bending back, upon itself, to encompass the most basic, most human, and most personal.

That the example is trivial makes it all the more striking. How in the hell did he know that I wanted my electronics in brilliant boxes? I didn't. 

Your tags:

TIP:

Enter the amount, and click "Tip" to submit!
Recipient's email address:
Personal message (optional):

Your email address:

Comments

Type your comment below:
My thoughts before reading what everyone else will be saying.

The video that was supposed to be embedded but is clickable is worth 2 minutes.

And, I was also thinking about the death last year of Lena Horne -- and the Cole Porter song that is about nothing but irony. But in this case, all the usual bright line distinctions between business and pleasure are, in fact blurred.
Great succinct post here. Perfect 2nd last paragraph. Thanks, Nick.
"There are rare individuals that can bend reality." Love that line.
Well said...all!
A gift is about everything. Not the thing. Everything.
How true this is...